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Archive for the ‘Colorado Facts’ Category

The Best Hot Springs around our Lodges!!

21 Jun
Colorado’s mountains have plenty of activities to get your heart racing, but they’re also perfect for kicking back. Dip into our many natural hot springs, where you can soothe sore muscles after a long day of hiking or skiing. Many also offer water slides and kid-friendly amenities.
Glenwood spring theriputic pool

1. Strawberry Park Hot SpringsSteamboat Springs
Stay in a tent or rent a rustic cabin, and make sure to book the signature watsu treatment: a bodywork massage that takes place in geothermal waters. Get back to nature by going au naturel — the hot springs become clothing optional after dark.

2. The Springs Resort and SpaPagosa Springs
This luxury resort boasts more than 20 soaking pools (including the world’s deepest geothermal spring), a full-service spa and salon and a separate luxury suites hotel, which is LEED-certified for its environmentally conscious design. Unwind in one of the five adults-only pools, which have sweeping views of the San Juan Mountains.

3. Waunita Hot Springs RanchGunnison
Surrounded by Gunnison National Forest, this remote lodge is an ideal getaway for horseback riding, fishing and swimming in the hot springs-fed pool. This family-friendly ranch also includes kid-appropriate activities like hayrides, horseshoes, fishing and more.

4. Glenwood Hot Springs LodgeGlenwood Springs
This lodge is perfect for the entire family, boasting the world’s largest hot springs pool, two water slides and a mini-golf course. Escape to the resort’s full-service spa, where you can enjoy a soothing massage in their historic, sandstone bathhouse.

5. Avalanche Ranch Cabins & Hot SpringsRedstone
Stay in a private log cabin overlooking the Rocky Mountains and enjoy 24-hour access to three secluded hot springs pools. This pastoral 36-acre ranch also features hiking trails, a stocked fishing pond and private riverfront access.

6. Old Town Hot SpringsSteamboat Springs
This complex touts eight geothermal pools, water slides, a fitness center, tennis courts, massage services and childcare. Book a private cabana on the upper deck to make a full day of it.

7. The Historic Wiesbaden Hot Springs Spa & LodgingsOuray
Book one of the historic accommodations in this European-style lodge and take a breather with an Aveda spa treatment and a dip in the therapeutic hot springs. Unwind in the natural vapor cave, which includes a 108-degree soaking pool.

8. Ouray Hot Springs Pool & Fitness CenterOuray
Surrounded by towering mountains and lush forests, this natural hot springs swimming pool is an inspiring place to bring your whole family. This crystal-clear pool boasts plenty of kid-approved amenities, such as a large slide, diving area, shallow section for young swimmers and a water volleyball area.

9. Indian Springs ResortIdaho Springs
Variety rules with geo-thermal caves, private baths, outdoor Jacuzzis and a mineral water pool, not to mention lodging options that range from campsites to resort rooms. Visit Club Mud, where you’ll spread mineral-rich clay over your skin and hair, let it dry and rinse it away for a smooth and shiny finish.

10. Mount Princeton Hot Springs ResortNathrop
This luxurious mountain resort boasts numerous geothermal springs. Its proximity to Monarch and Ski Cooper ski areas makes a perfect aprés ski muscle relaxant. Thirty small pools are located right in Chalk Creek, which runs alongside the property and adds a super-natural feel to your soak.

11. Hot Sulphur Springs Resort & SpaHot Sulphur Springs
This resort’s waters, which run in the town of the same name, have been flowing from seven natural springs for hundreds of years and were used for healing by the Ute Indians. Hop from pool to pool to try out different temperatures and views.

12. Orvis Hot SpringsRidgway
Seven pools in this San Juan Mountain paradise range from 98 degrees to the very steamy — and appropriately named — Lobster Pot, which can get up to 114 degrees. The unique gravel-bottom “pond” is known for Mount Sneffels vistas and massaging waterfalls.

13. Dunton Hot Springs, near Telluride
This all-inclusive resort is set in a restored ghost town, featuring private log cabins, mineral-rich hot springs and long-table dinners held in a 1800s saloon. Enjoy the soaking pool inside the restored 19th-century bathhouse or venture to Colorado’s only geyser, which is located nearby.

14. Overlook Hot Springs SpaPagosa Springs
Roof-top tubs, five indoor pools and one completely private tub give you options for any weather or occasion. Sunset Magazine recently named this hot springs, tucked inside a Victorian-era storefront, a great aprés-ski option just half an hour from Wolf Creek Ski Area.

15. Healing Waters Resort & SpaPagosa Springs
With lodging options spanning an RV park to rooms and suites with full kitchens as well as a full-service spa, Healing Waters makes sure you don’t need to leave the grounds for a relaxing getaway. Consider an Aquastretch treatment in one of the warm-water pools to soothe weary muscles.

16. Box Canyon Lodge & Hot SpringsOuray
Situated in a peaceful courtyard beneath a scenic mountainside with 360-degree views, the Box Canyon Lodge’s hot-springs tubs are available only to overnight guests. Frequent guests recommend taking in a San Juan sunrise on the lodge’s bench swings.

17. Trimble Spa & Natural Hot SpringsDurango
Relax in the sauna, swim laps in the massive naturally heated mineral pool, picnic and sunbathe poolside and soothe body and soul with massage treatments. There are a couple of lodging options for those who just can’t tear themselves away from the geothermal waters.

18. Valley View Hot SpringsVilla Grove
This non-profit, clothing-optional, off-the-grid spot is a unique way to experience the land of the San Luis Valley. Several all-natural soaking ponds are found along wilderness trails, while a hot tub and sauna are heated geothermically and hydroelectrically. Reservations strongly recommended.

19. Joyful Journey Hot Springs SpaMoffat
This San Luis Valley gem pulls its 140-degree artesian mineral waters from beneath the Sangre de Cristo mountains. Pools are gravity-fed and cooled to a comfortable and relaxing 98–110 degrees. Find unique lodging options can be found in the yurt and a tiny tipi village.

strawberryparkhotsprings

 
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Posted in Activities for the Family, Adventure Activities!, Colorado Facts, Hot Spings, Summer Activities!

 

Local News for Summit County

29 Jan

Silverthorne_logo

 

01/29/2013

 

News More Local News

 

Vail Resorts has strong holiday performance But bad early season weather accounts for losses that are hard to make up 

After slow start, Summit County snowsports sales are picking up speed Local retailers say they’re coming out of a downward trend 

Breckenridge exhibit showcases 100 years of Summit County skiing For whatever the reason, skiers, snowboarders and other downhillers seem to love dressing up and hitting the hill in retro gear on April Fool’s Day and other holidays 

Dillon Marina receives top honor from national magazine

Being hundreds of miles away from the ocean didn’t stop Dillon Marina from gaining recognition as being one of the best in the country

 

Silverthorne moving forward on downtown development plans

Open house slated for Feb. 6

 

Snow sculptors converge on Breckenridge Event sees wide international field for 2013 competition 

Raising roofs in Summit County’s rocky terrain Habitat for Humanity planning new home in spring 

Breckenridge restaurants, retailers seeing increases

Lowest vacancy rate in four years

 

Copper Mountain launches uphill access pass Skinners looking for early morning powder turns will be able to find them at Copper Mountain 

Occupancy trends looking up for Summit County lodging

Positive projections for end of January, February

 

 

Trail expansion!

05 Feb

More trails to OPEN!!!

A seven-year work in progress, the Golden Horseshoe Management Plan will soon move from the draft stage into the long-awaited final approval and implementation stage.The plan for how trails in the open space area near Breckenridge will be used, maintained and developed is a joint effort between the three management agencies: Town of Breckenridge, Summit County and the U.S. Forest Service. Though it covers recreation, the plan also includes guidelines for handling natural resources and cultural resources. The 8,900 acre area lies between French Gulch on the south, Colorado Highway 9 on the west, and the Swan River drainage on the north. It lies north and east of the core of the Town of Breckenridge.

Breckenridge Town Council approved the draft plan Tuesday. It now awaits the OK from the Summit Board of County Commissioners, which should take place in early March.

Breckenridge Open Space and Trails director Scott Reid said changes could still be made to the plan, but based on feedback from the county commissioners at their Tuesday meeting, he doesn’t anticipate anything substantive.

“There are no surprises in here as far as we’re concerned,” Reid said, adding that the appendices of the document show the “exhaustive public input” that came in through the years.

It didn’t go without contest, though.

“It was a contentious process,” Summit County Open Space and Trails director Brian Lorch said, though he added, “We have not heard opposition (or questions) in a couple years.”

The major hang-up in getting the Golden Horseshoe Management Plan finalized was waiting for the Forest Service to finalize its Travel Management Plan, which will go into effect in May. The agency manages the most miles in the area, Reid said.

“This plan nests within that plan,” he said.

With the plan nearly finalized, officials are looking toward their next step: implementation.

The Forest Service’s goal is to get signs in place to mark trails that are open and closed according to the plan, Forest Service recreation staff officer Ken Waugh said.

“People should look for travel management signs,” Waugh said, adding that down the road when trail decommissioning takes place, they should respect revegetation areas. Motorized users can educate themselves with a Motor Vehicle Use Map, which will be released in May. Single-sheet guides are also available through the Forest Service’s Dillon Ranger District Office in Silverthorne.

Reid said that, though he doesn’t anticipate push-back as the document moves forward, he expects a reaction when implementation occurs.

“The old policy was: If it’s unsigned, you’re allowed on it. The new policy is: You’re not allowed on it unless it’s signed,” Reid said. “You must remain on designated routes. If you’re on an non-designated route, you’re automatically at issue.”

The rule applies to wheeled vehicles from bicycles to off-highway vehicles. Hikers and horses are exempt and can travel at will through the area, Reid said.

Reid added that though some users might be disappointed at the restrictions, they’ll be excited to see improvements to trails that can happen now that the travel management plan is nearly complete.

More info

The Golden Horseshoe Management Plan is available on the Town of Breckenridge’s website.

 

There’s an open house slated for 4:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 10, to exhibit preliminary designs for a new segment of the town’s Blue River recreation pathway from Town Hall to the Willow Grove Open Space.

Construction of the 2,100-foot segment is planned for summer 2011 and will be partially funded by a $500,000 grant from Great Outdoors Colorado. The segment is meant to connect two segments of trail that are currently connected by residential roads, improving aesthetics and safety.

 

Fishing 15 minutes from our Lodges!

22 Aug

Our Local Chief of Police caught a Monster trout Just 15 minutes North of our Lodge! Green Mountain Resivour is the home for LARGE  lake trout!

 
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Posted in Colorado Facts, Fishing around Our Lodges!, Silverthorne Area, Wildlife Around the Lodges

 

Silverthorne Colorado Improvements right next to Riverside Lodge!!

09 Jul

Wildernest Bridge Work Complete

The Town of Silverthorne is pleased with the end result of the Wildernest Road Bridge Resurfacing Project, including the construction timing and the public’s cooperation with the related detour plan.

The project took approximately 11 calendar days to complete which allowed for the bridge to be open to traffic by the beginning of the Memorial Day Holiday weekend.Though the detour may have taken some time to get used to and may have caused slight inconveniences, it was necessary in order to make these bridge repairs while also ensuring the safest possible work and driving environments.The Town of Silverthorne thanks motorists for their cooperation during this process.


Additional Sand Volleyball Courts Coming to Rainbow Park

The Town of Silverthorne is installing two new sand volleyball courts at Rainbow Park this summer.The courts are scheduled to be completed and ready for play by August. The new courts are adjacent to the two existing sand courts located next to the tennis courts.The project is possible thanks to generous donations from private sector businesses.Tom Davenport, with Denver based Volleyball of the Rockies, contacted the Town last month and offered to donate 400 tons of sand, nets, and boundary lines for two new courts.To complete the project, the Town needed to supply gravel for the subsurface, which was not in the Town’s budget.However, Silverthorne based Everist Materials graciously offered to donate 200 tons of washed rock for the project, after Public Works Director Bill Linfield asked the company for assistance.“The donation is a generous gift, and we are very grateful. The Town has worked with Everist on many projects over the years and we are very appreciative of the support. donation allowed us to proceed with a project that will benefit the entire community for years to come,” stated Linfield.

New Rainbow Park Playground Nears Completion

The opening day for the playground is almost here!  If the weather cooperates allowing final construction items to be addressed in the next few days, the playground will open on Saturday July 10.  The equipment is all in place now, but the poured in place rubber surface is not yet completed so we have to ask the kids to wait just a bit longer before they can climb on all of the great new structures we’ve installed.

A formal ribbon cutting ceremony is also being planned and will also be announced at Silverthorne.org when details are available.

Where are the public fishing locations on the Blue River?

We often get this question, particularly from our many visitors, so to clear up the issue the Town has created a brochure that highlights seven distinct sections of the Blue River as it makes its three mile run through Silverthorne.The map, available soon at the Recreation Center and Town Hall, provides a clear picture of public access and public parking available near the river.descriptions of the types of water features in each section are also included in the brochure.The Town of Silverthorne is committed to protecting, preserving, and improving the gold medal water of the Blue River and has spent over $700,000 (largely obtained through grants) to improve the health of the river.

The Town would like to thank SPORT Committee members Don Hansen and Nathan Mosley for creating the fishing map with the assistance of Public Works Administrative Assistant Diane Salamon.

Outlets at Silverthorne Welcomes Guess

GUESS Factory Store at the Outlets at Silverthorne opened its doors in mid-June and held a grand opening/ribbon cutting ceremony on Monday, June 28.   Now a global presence, GUESS got its start with a great pair of jeans.In 1981, The Marciano brothers founded a small denim company in California.Today, GUESS has grown to be one of the largest and most successful fashion brands in the world with over 1,113 GUESS stores worldwide.Through their innovative design, marketing and distribution of fashion lifestyle products, GUESS has become one of the most widely recognized fashion leaders in the young contemporary women’s and men’s markets across the globe.The GUESS Factory Store at the Outlets at Silverthorne will carry men’s and women’s fashion-forward apparel, handbags, watches, shoes and more! The store is located  in Unit 227-I in the Blue Village, between Great Outdoor Clothing Company and Pearl Izumi.


 
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Posted in Colorado Facts, Silverthorne Area

 

See the Mountains by Boat!

13 Jun

Touring Lake Dillon by boat is something the entire family can enjoy. We rent a house boat each year and every time we seem to find something new to explore.  We back a huge cooler with a picnic lunch and lots of beverages to enjoy throughout the day! The weather can change VERY quickly so I recommend starting in late morning because the storms and high winds tend to arrive in mid afternoon. A few years back we got pinned down in a very active storm with winds reaching in excess of 4 miles per hour…the kids thought it was a blast, but we all got pretty wet! Oh yes did I mention sunblock…lots of it!

DILLON — Want to scope out marmots, bear and birds while learning tantalizing details of Dillon history?

You can do all this while relaxing in your very own guided pontoon boat on Dillon Reservoir. For only $7 each, up to 14 people can fit in a boat on a one-hour cruise. Tours will be conducted Mondays and Tuesdays throughout June.

Whether you’re visiting Summit County or call it your home, there’s something for everyone on an “EXPLORE Lake Dillon” interpretive tour of the lake (and Denver Water’s main water source). Just don’t forget to dress in layers and slather on sunscreen. At almost 9,600 feet, the Dillon Reservoir can at one minute be hot and sunny, then cool and breezy.

Manned by a captain and Summit County Historical Society’s tour guide Linda Kelly, guided tours start June 14 and last about an hour. With the help of the boat captain, Kelly will narrate the ride, covering different facets of Dillon Reservoir, the old town of Dillon which that was located beneath the lake, and the surrounding area.

“This is a first-year trial,” said Dillon spokeswoman Susan Fairweather. “If it’s received well, we’ll consider adding additional dates.”

Though the actual boat route could vary due to wind, tours will generally cover where the old town of Dillon used to be, what’s what in terms of mountains and other landmarks, Roberts Tunnel (how the water is transported to Denver from the reservoir), the Dillon Nature Preserve, lodgepole pines and its decimation by the mountain pine beetle, the early days of the railroad, and Summit County’s mining history.


The Dillon Marina will soon be giving guided tours on their pontoon boats in conjunction with the Summit Historical Society. The tours will relate to the history of the reservoir and surrounding areas including old Dillon, mining and the mountain ranges visible from the lake.
Summit Daily/Mark Fox
More info:
“EXPLORE” Lake Dillon boat tours will be conducted Mondays and Tuesdays: June 14, 15, 21, 22, at 9:45 a.m.
Tours will start at the Dillon Marina for $7 per person, and reservations are a must.
Minimum age: 7
Call (970) 468-5100 or visit www.dillonmarina.com for more information.
 
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Posted in Activities for the Family, Colorado Facts, Dillon Area

 

Improving the Fish Habitat

08 Jun

As you have probably concluded we love Colorado for many reasons! Reason Number 76 is the DNR (Department of Natural Resources) does an unbelievable job of repopulating fish in our Rivers. Below describes one such effort. I find it interesting how much effort goes into making  Colorado what it is today!

As part of an ongoing effort to improve river habitat for several endangered fish species, releases from various reservoirs will be increased this week and next as part of the Coordinated Reservoirs Operations Program.

Iniated in 1995 as part of the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program, the coordinated release effort is aimed to enhance spring peak flows in the Colorado critical to the survival of four species: the humpback chub, razorback sucker, bonytail chub and Colorad pikeminnow. Friday and Saturday, Green Mountain Reservoir releases were increased by 200 cubic feet per second, and outflows from Wolford Mountain Reservoir were increased by 200 cfs above inflow over the weekend. Increased outflows may continue through Wednesday.

“The release boosting this year’s Colorado River peak are a tonic that will make the river healtheir, and that benefits everyone from water users, to recreation and all the fish that call the river home,” said Bart Miller, Water Program Director for Western Resources Advocates.

 
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Posted in Colorado Facts, Fishing around Our Lodges!

 

Rafting In Summit County 2010

05 Jun

Ok friends, it looks like the 2010 rafting season will be another great year! The Blue River that runs right through our Riverside Lodges East and West is navigable! This means the surrounding rafting rivers are also going to be a blast! Do not miss out on this exhilarating activity! Remember to bring your sunscreen or you could end up like me, burned to a crisp! (I have done this m0re than once)

Sure, Colorado may be best known for its skiing, but the same snow-covered peaks that give us our world-class slopes also provide another unique recreational asset — rivers, as in rafting.

“Colorado is the Mecca,” veteran river guide Duke Bradford said regarding the quality of the area’s whitewater. “The fact we have these huge mountains with incredible grading, it’s remarkable. The water, coming down that grading, makes for amazing rivers.”

And the areas in and surrounding Summit County are great examples of that.

In close proximity, Bradford said, there’s a stretch of water for “anyone,” regardless of ability or fitness level.

“Right in our own backyard, we have some unique circumstances,” said Bradford, who’s the director of Breckenridge-based Arkansas Valley Adventures. “The Continental Divide provides both the Eastern and Western slopes with great whitewater, and we have access to it all.”

The Blue, Arkansas and Colorado rivers, along with Clear Creek, all provide world-class rafting, and Bradford said the seasons for each look very promising.

The same couldn’t have been said just a few months ago.

Along with the rest of the state’s whitewater enthusiasts, Bradford was a bit concerned about what the summer would hold — or rather, if the rivers would be holding much at all.

The snowpack was low, and the outlook for whitewater was even lower around March. But a late cold snap in April and May vaulted the moisture levels back near average numbers, and, as Bradford put it, “more snow means more whitewater.”

“The water’s looking great,” Bradford said. “It’s up, but not to the point you have to be worried about it being dangerous in stretches.”

A true sign of the season, Bradford said, is that there’s a season at all on the Blue River. Some years, the river’s flows (below the Dillon Reservoir) are far too low to raft at all.

That’s not a problem this year.

Bradford said the Blue is currently running well. And, as the river may hit its peak in the coming weeks — possibly even days — now’s the time to go down it.

“It’s anyone’s guess how long it’ll last, but we should have at least a couple weeks,” he added about the Blue.

The Arkansas, however, is looking to have a long season, possibly past the end of August, due to high amounts of winter precipitation on Hoosier Pass. Bradford said the “Ark” is commonly consistent for boaters, as it has controlled releases from the reservoir.

Clear Creek, in the stretches near Idaho Springs, is already running well and should continue to do so until early August.

“That’s the closest, most consistent whitewater we have,” Bradford said.

And in each of the rivers, Bradford said a boater of every ability can find the stretch that’s right for them.

For instance, the Colorado River has arguably the best stretch of class IV and V rapids anywhere in the country in Gore Canyon near Kremmling. There’s a waterfall, long runs, and Bradford said the stretch is strictly for the “active and aggressive” boaters with a whole lot of experience. (Swimming tests — including recovery from under the raft — are required to paddle down the area.)

On the other hand, the Colorado also offers some pretty leisurely paced float trips.

“It’s all about finding the section that’s right for you,” Bradford said. “There are so many options, you just don’t want to be over your head.”

Bradford said any of the county’s many outfitters would easily steer a boater in the right direction.

After all, finding the right run, Bradford said, can lead to one of the best experiences Colorado offers.

“Being out on the river — It’s just a big, majestic place,” he said. “The environment a river takes you to is off the beaten path, it’s not something you see doing anything else. To experience something like that is certainly unique to Colorado.”

 
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Posted in Activities for the Family, Colorado Facts, Lodge News, Silverthorne Area

 

What Determines The Flow Of the Blue River That Runs Though Our Property?

02 Jun

It is important to understand how the water flow in the Blue River is determined. This effects our fishing and rafting in it! The simple guide line is in the Spring and early Summer the flow is generally higher and in Fall and Winter it is less. But when in doubt just check with the Forest Service office about 1 mile North on Hwy 9! Remember, as shown above the Source for the River is a Dam, that is why the River produces HUGE trout and large swings in CFS water flow amounts!

Water from Dillon Reservoir began flowing through the morning glory spillway into the Lower Blue River at 5 a.m. Tuesday. Water spills through the “glory hole” when the reservoir’s water level reaches its full elevation of 9,017 feet.

Water also flows through the waterworks and into the Blue River from the bottom of the dam. The spillway ensures water never flows over the top of the dam.

Outflows into the Lower Blue reached 235 cubic feet per second (cfs) Tuesday, with 220 of that coming from the bottom of the dam. As the snowpack continues to melt, the percentage of water coming from the top of the reservoir, via the spillway, will increase.

Outflows into the Lower Blue are forecast to peak at 1,100 cfs on June 9. Inflows are forecast to peak at 1,300 cfs on June 9.

Actual peak flows will vary from the forecasts depending on weather: Warm, sunny weather would produce higher peak flows over a relatively short period of time; cooler, cloudier weather — resulting in slower snowmelt — would translate to a lower-

volume peak spread over a longer period of time.

The Lower Blue is generally fine for rafting at flows higher than 500 cfs. To reduce the likelihood of flooding along the Lower Blue, Denver Water tries to ensure that peak outflow doesn’t exceed 1,800 cfs.

“There is always some risk of flooding downstream,” said Denver Water’s manager of raw water supply, Bob Steger. “The reservoir could be spilling, and we could get a bunch of rain. That’s a risk we have every year while we’re spilling.”

The historic average peak inflow is about 1,700 cfs, and Steger said this year’s flows would not likely reach that level. Average peak outflow is about 1,100 cfs and occurs around June 20.

“People in Silverthorne still need to be kind of diligent in understanding that anything can happen as far as weather is concerned,” Steger said.


 
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Posted in Activities for the Family, Colorado Facts, Fishing around Our Lodges!, Silverthorne Area

 

Summit Peaks’ Top 10 Reasons to Visit us for Summer!

29 May

Top Ten Reasons To Visit Summit County this Summer:

10) 300 days of sunshine annually

9) World class Fishing

8) 5 Golf Courses within a 10 minute drive

7) Average daily high temp of 70

6) Endless Mountain Bike Trails

5) Endless hiking

4) Live Music!

3) BBQ’s every night!

2) Art and Film Festivals every weekend!

1) Breathtaking views around Every Corner!



 
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Posted in Activities for the Family, Colorado Facts, Lodge News, Trails and hiking near the Lodges!, Wildlife Around the Lodges

 

Silverthorne information!

17 May

Of course you know we are partial to this town in that our Lodges are located here and the people are especially nice!

Silverthorne Colorado


The Town of Silverthorne incorporated in the 1960’s and has flourished with the tourism brought on by the ski industry ever since. With the Blue River and its world-class fly fishing and proximity to the Ptarmigan and Eagles Nest Wilderness areas, Silverthorne is an outdoor enthusiast’s dream destination. Summer or winter, Silverthorne offers numerous Summit County activities and state-of-the-art facilities such as its newly completed Recreation Center for indoor adventures in fitness. The Dillon/Silverthorne Factory Outlet Stores provide over 70 brand name shops which are widely known for quality, value and variety and help make Silverthorne a popular stop for all visitors to the area.


Driving Directions

From Denver, Colorado:


  • Take I-70 WEST exit towards GRAND JUNCTION / IDAHO SPRINGS and drive for 55 miles.
  • Take the CO-9 NORTH / SILVERTHORNE(US-6 E) exit towards SILVERTHORNE, exit #205 and you are in Silverthorne, Colorado.

Silverthorne Recreation Center

Silverthorne Silverthorne Recreation CenterEncompassing 62,000 square feet, the recreation center features quality facilities, recreational programming and activities for all ages. The center offers yoga, land and water aerobics, personal training, indoor cycling, fitness equipment, racquetball courts, babysitting and massages therapy. Whether in for a full workout or a soak in the Jacuzzi after a day on the slopes, the Silverthorne Recreation Center has something for everyone.

Hours of Operation:
Monday – Friday 6:00am – 9:00pm
Saturday – 7:00am – 9:00pm
Sunday – 8:00am – 9:00pm


For more information call 970-262-7370

Silverthorne Pavilion


Silverthorne Silverthorne PavilionWhat a better place to have your big wedding day than at an elegant pavilion bordering the Blue River in Silverthorne. With magnificent balconies, arched ceilings, French doors, spectacular chandeliers, abundance of natural light and cozy furnishings you can have the perfect setting for a mountain wedding. Not to forget about the large dance floor and elevated area for a live band or DJ. To view this attractive venue call 970-262-7390.

Location:
400 Blue River Highway
Silverthorne, Colorado 80498

Phone Number:
970-262-7390

 
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Posted in Activities for the Family, Colorado Facts, Lodge News, Lodge Orientation, Silverthorne Area

 

Georgetown Loop Railroad_Great Family fun!

17 May

Devil's Gate High Bridge

We have had many guests and family members do this and I have not had 1 bad review yet! The views are one of a kind. As usual I recommend the earlier in the day the better before the afternoon storms build! Enjoy.


Georgetown Loop Railroad


The History of the railroad dates back to the time when the mountains were not only majestic, but the treasures they held within were extremely valuable. The silver ore found inside the mountains between Georgetown and Silver Plume in the 1860’s turned out one of the great silver-producing regions in the world.

By 1877, a rail line connected Denver to Golden and Georgetown was completed. The engineers did not stop there, but were presented with a challenge of connecting Georgetown to Silver Plume to climb more than 600 feet in just 2 miles while climbing one of Colorado’s steep canyons.

It took 200 men to lay 4 miles of track, building one of the world’s most famous engineering masterpieces, The Devil’s Gate High Bridge. Over a 100 years later, a ride on the Georgetown Loop Railroad brings you back in time. The beauty seen on the ride is spectacular and the experience will last a lifetime.

The adventure can be started at 1106 Rose Street at the Old Georgetown Station. You may also explore the history and miner’s livelihood with a tour of the Lebanon Silver Mine. The mine tour is accessible only by train. The Georgetown Loop Railroad invites you and your family to ride the railroad this summer. For railroad tours, the reservation phone number is 1-888-4-LOOP-RR (1-888-456-6777).

 
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Posted in Activities for the Family, Colorado Facts, Silverthorne Area

 

The White River National Forest surrounds Summit Peaks Lodges!

13 May

weed pull project in Aspen

Our Lodges are nestled in this wonderful forest. Please not fires and keep track of the kids, if they wonder off it could be a problem! 😉

Natural Resources

The White River National Forest is open to anyone, but how much do you really know about the plants, animals, and other natural features of the area?

Find out more about the physical, biological and ecological aspects of the central Rockies that make the area unique. The spectacular landscape of the forest was shaped by continental and alpine glaciers. Valleys were carved out and lakes left behind. This created the land that early American Indians inhabited, and Eastern settlers viewed in awe.

Regional Bark Beetle Information

There are forests in Colorado, Wyoming, and South Dakota that are experiencing bark beetle epidemics at a historically unprecedented scale.

Lynx Amendment

The Forest Service is proposing to amend seven Land and Resource Management Plans in the Southern Rockies to adopt conservation measures for Canada lynx, a threatened species.

Species Conservation Project

The Species Conservation Program provides leadership to promote and coordinate positive actions that contribute to recovery of threatened and endangered species.

Continental Divide NST

The U.S. Forest Service received over 8,000 formal comments on the proposed directive for the development and management of the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail.

 
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Posted in Activities for the Family, Colorado Facts, Trails and hiking near the Lodges!

 

We have it all in Silverthorne!

09 May

Linda Mirro got this closeup of the Silverthorne ospreys.

Spring in Colorado is like know other! This Osprey has a giant nest about 1 mile north on HWY 9 from our Lodge.  The mother and father catch fish from the surrounding river and ponds and then carry them back to their chicks in the giant nest.A  Litter of fox can be seen down by the Ace Hardware store in 2009. This is where we saw our 1st BLACK fox…simply amazing. We brought the kids down there each day to watch them play near their den.




Then there is the Red Fox that visitis our Lodge’s deck each late afternoon! I know this is hard to believe but it is true!

Linda Mirro got this closeup of the Silverthorne ospreys.

This photo is takes about 1 mile north of the Lodges up HWY 9

 
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Posted in Colorado Facts, Wildlife Around the Lodges

 

Spring Skiing! Be cautious!

09 May

Our ski season starts in October and lasts into June or sometimes even July! Loveland and A-Basin are the two mountains that are the 1st in the entire county to open and A-basin is one of the last to close. If you have never skied in June this is a real fun experience. The crowd in one of a kind! It is not uncommon to see bikinis!

SUMMIT COUNTY — The amount of open skiing terrain in Summit County continues to decline while spring rolls along. Bad behavior by skiers and boarders, on the other hand, seems to increase as the ropes creep inward.

Poaching closed terrain is among the most common — and dangerous — of spring-time rule-breaking. And young men in their late teens and early 20s comprise the majority of offenders.

“It’s not a new thing,” said Arapahoe Basin general manager Alan Henceroth. “Sometimes they do it, and they don’t realize it’s a hazard. Sometimes they just don’t care. It’s hard to deal with either of those reasons.

Why do they do it?

With their ski passes and their lives at stake, it seems illogical that skiers and riders would take the risks of entering closed terrain. But logic doesn’t heavily factor into the decision-making process for the demographic group most likely to poach, according to University of Colorado psychology professor Tina Pittman Wagers.

“Adolescents are kind of notorious for having poor impulse control,” Pittman Wagers said.

In terms of neurological development, human adolescence spans the ages of 13-25 for males. Females usually mature by age 23. During that period, there are a host of reasons why they take risks that seem unnecessary or doltish to people in other age groups. In fact, adolescent males deal with a perfect storm of evolutionary, physical, social and neurological factors that practically destine them to go out of bounds, both literally and figuratively.

“Even in nonhuman adolescents, like rats and chimps, we see a lot of the same behavior. Adolescent rats do a lot of the same stuff as human adolescent males,” Pittman Wagers said.

At some point during adolescence, males must move away from their families and find somewhere else to live. So for the sake of survival, it becomes advantageous to give less deference to authority.

“This desire to try things their families haven’t and things that other adults have defined as off-limits for them — it’s evolutionarily appropriate, and we all do it, regardless of our species,” Pittman Wagers said.

For the same reason, adolescent males are drawn to novelty. So as ski areas and individual runs close, making laps on the same slopes over and over holds little appeal.

As the importance of family-defined boundaries wane, adolescents become much more preoccupied with the opinions and expectations of their peers. And since authority figures are less important in peers’ minds too, the allure of risky behavior is compounded.

In childhood, people are rewarded for complying with parents’ requests. As an adult, too, rewards come from following the rules, i.e., earning a degree, succeeding at work and obeying the law.

“In adolescence, all that goes out the window. Risky behavior garners a lot of social status from friends who are egging them on and talking about it later,” Pittman Wagers said.

Mating and courtship are also very important to adolescents, further driving risk-taking. Males in particular will take on risks that demonstrate strength and physical prowess. And at that age, their bodies are especially strong and agile, amplifying their sense of what’s possible athletically.

“If (a skier or rider) is looking at an out-of-bounds area, he’s thinking, ‘My buddy is going to think I’m so cool. And he’s going to tell this story to that chick I’m interested in when we meet up at the bar.’ That incentive is much more powerful for an adolescent than for someone who’s 40, who’s thinking, ‘I’m going to get in trouble with ski patrol, or I’m going to break my leg.’”

The deck is stacked against adolescents neurologically as well, when it comes to risk aversion. The prefrontal cortex, which helps humans control impulses, is relatively underdeveloped in adolescents. But subcortical parts of the brain, which deal with emotional information and evaluation of incentives, are very active in adolescents. So for a 20-year-old who’s contemplating ducking a rope, the emotional thrill of fresh powder could be much more salient than the physical or legal ramifications of breaking the law.

“They pay a lot more attention to short-term gain than long-term consequences. They’re paying a lot of attention to especially exciting positive incentives,” Pittman Wagers said.

 
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Colorado History

21 Apr

Here are some curious things you might not know about Colorado.

Highest Climb. The highest vertical climb is not on a mountain but up the north side of the Black Canyon.. Rising 1,700 feet, this sheer rock face is even higher than the famous Diamond on Longs Peak and was not conquered until 1969.

Deepest Snow. In 1899 Crested Butte recorded 254 inches of snow near the top of Kebler Pass. That year, snow buried a train near Leadville and left only stove pipes showing above cabins at many mountain towns. Usually, Wolf Creek Pass near Pagosa Springs gets the most snow in Colorado.

Oldest Hotel. The Peck House in the little town of Empire, near Berthoud Pass, is Colorado’s oldest hotel. It was built in 1859 by James Peck. Early guests included President Ulysses S. Grant and other famous people.

Highest Town. Leadville is the highest (10,200 feet) incorporated town in Colorado and the entire U.S. It has also had the highest rate of premature babies in the U.S. Researchers concluded that the altitude causes smaller babies.

Largest Nuggets. The biggest gold nugget in Colorado weighed 135 ounces and was found near Breckenridge in 1887 by miner Tom Broves. The biggest silver nugget weighed 1,840 pounds and was found at an Aspen mine in 1894.

Largest Elk Antlers. Measuring 52 inches at the widest point, the antlers of an elk killed in 1899 near Crested Butte are still on display at that town’s visitor center. In 1961, Boone and Crockett researchers declared it to be the largest elk rack in history.

Toughest Climate. No crops are grown around the town of Silverton, north of Durango. At 9,318 feet elevation, Silverton’s growing season between frosts is only two weeks. San Juan County there is reportedly the only county in the U.S. without a single acre of agricultural land.

Worst Drought. About every 40 years, Colorado experiences a drought, according to tree-ring researchers. The worst was in the 1200s. It lasted 25 years and may have driven the Indians from Mesa Verde. During the Dust Bowl on the eastern plains, one cloud of dust on April 4, 1935, gathered itself to 1,000 feet high and 200 miles wide. It traveled at 60 miles an hour, suffocated hundreds of animals and damaged many people’s health.
Driest Town. Delta, south of Grand Junction, gets less rain per year than Tucson, Arizona.

Musical Dunes. Winds blowing around the Great Sand Dunes near Alamosa create sounds resembling music. That’s how Music Pass above the dunes got its name.

Women’s Rights. Colorado was the second state in the U.S. to give women the right to vote. Wyoming was the first. You would think the eastern states would have been more progressive, but it took the frontier adventure to make men realize how strong and intelligent women were.

 
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Posted in Colorado Facts